Hike

Outdoor First Aid

QNUK Level 3 Award (RQF)

This qualification will provide the skills, knowledge and understanding to support individuals carrying out a First Aid role in an outdoor environment where help may be up to 2 hours away. This is a 2 day course.

Outdoor First Aid Qualification Overview

 

Course Duration

The qualification requires 16 contact learning hours (minimum). The maximum period to achieve this, including referrals, is 6 weeks.

 

Certification and requalification

Course certificates will be valid for 3 years from the date of the end of the first aid course. The Learner needs to retake the qualification before the certificate expiry date to remain qualified. Certification will be with the certified Awarding Organisation Qualifications Network or QNUK.

 

Intended audience

This qualification is for those working in the outdoors environment where they may need to provide first aid to casualty in a situation where help may be up to two hours away.

 

Assessment

Formative assessment will be conducted throughout the course with additional short multiple choice exam papers.

 

Venues and equipment

In line with current regulations, venues will need to be a minimum of 100 square metres to accommodate up to 12 people safely, and, for smaller courses; a minimum of 50 square meters to accommodate up to 6 people -  along with the trainer, training resources: flipchart, projector, CPR manikins, AED training machines (1 per 4 learners), kneeling pads, bandages and paperwork to train and assess the course. Outdoor courses also require the same amount of outdoor space available as some of the learning exercises and assessments take place outdoors.

 

 

Covid health and safety measures

A venue risk assessment will be carried out in advance to confirm that there is enough space and that the venue meets safety standards conducive to learning.  A further assessment will be carried on the day to ensure that conditions remain the same.  Attendees will be required to wear masks and use hand gel regularly throughout the day, as well as wash their hands.  Temperatures will be taken on arrival and anyone with a temperature above 38 degrees will be asked to return home. More detailed guidance will be sent out when the course is booked.

 

Course quality assurance

After each course learners are asked to complete a short evaluation on the day and afterwards they are emailed another opportunity to provide feedback about their training.  Pre course joining instructions sent to learners include a request for information about special requirements, information about learner complaints / appeals procedures.

 

At the start of each course learners are informed about appeals and grievance procedures. To maintain quality a maximum 1:12 trainer to learner ratio is set for this course.

OFA Measurable Achievements

1. Understand the role and responsibilities of a First Aider in an outdoors environment; in relation to:

managing hazards,  prioritising casualties, identifying possible injuries, identifying and using appropriate First Aid equipment, principles of effective casualty communication. 

 

2. How to minimise the risk of infection to self and others.  Importance of hand hygiene. Using sterile equipment. Using equipment correctly. Correct disposal of used/disposable first aid equipment.

 

3. The need for consent to provide First Aid. Why they need consent.  When consent should be obtained. 

 

4. . Be able to manage an incident in an outdoors environment; in relation to: conducting a scene survey, awareness of the environment, other hazards, bystanders.

 

5. Conducting a primary survey of a casualty  Primary survey of a casualty, to include: dangers, response, open airway, breathing check.

 

 6. Protecting a casualty from environmental factors  -  Relocating casualty, insulating casualty, using/creating using shelter.

 

 7. Summoning appropriate assistance when necessary oncompletion of primary survey. Type of assistance required: bystanders or emergency services.

 

8. How to administer First Aid to a casualty at risk of hypothermia: Protection from elements, insulating casualty, using shelter.

 

9. Monitoring casualty’s vital signs, including: radial and carotid pulse, breathing, response and pallor. 

 

10. Be able to provide First Aid to a casualty that is unresponsive and not breathing normally;  

when to administer Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) to a casualty.  Differentiate between casualties who require resuscitation and those who should be placed into a recovery position.

 

11. Demonstrating CPR on a manikin  Basic CPR in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines. 

 

12. Demonstrating the use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Correctly place AED pads, following instructions from AED unit. 

 

13. Modifications of CPR in relation to: a child, drowning, avalanche,  lightning strike, remote from immediate help.  Basic life support protocols: paediatric protocol, adult drowning protocol. Consideration given to when, and if, to start CPR.

 

14. Be able to provide First Aid to a casualty that is unresponsive and is breathing normally; in relation to: 

when to place a casualty into the recovery position  Differentiate between casualties who require resuscitation those who should be placed into a recovery position. 

 

15. Demonstrating how to place a casualty into the recovery position  Recovery position in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines.

 

16. How to administer First Aid to a casualty who is experiencing a seizure.  Actions to undertake while a casualty is in seizure. Management of the casualty once the seizure has stopped.  Recommended times to call the emergency services. 

 

17. Be able to provide First Aid to a casualty who is choking; in relation to: when choking is: mild or severe.  Recognising features of a mild, and a severe obstruction of the airway.  Treatment protocol for a choking casualty in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines.

 

18. Be able to provide First Aid to a casualty with external bleeding; in relation to: how to administer First Aid to a casualty with a minor wound.  Dealing with minor wounds in accordance with current practice, including: cuts, bruises.

 

19. Identify the severity of external bleeding - the characteristics of capillary, venous and arterial bleeding. 

Demonstrate how to control external bleeding.  Management of a casualty with a bleed, including: dressing common wounds to the head, arm, hand or leg. 

 

20. Recognise the common features of a casualty in hypovolemic shock. How to administer First Aid to a casualty who is suffering from shock  including: position, keep warm, nil by mouth, moisten lips , importance of reassurance, referral to the emergency services. 

 

21. Insect  bites, including ticks -  how to remove them and risk of Lyme disease.  Stings , embedded objects, grazes.

 

22. How to administer First Aid to a casualty with minor burns and scalds  Assess severity of burn and provide treatment in accordance with current practice. 

 

23. How to provide First Aid to a casualty affected by immersion in water; in relation to: how to administer First Aid to a casualty who has been immersed in water  Awareness of risk of secondary drowning and hypothermia.